Categories
Blog

Fostering Awareness of Public Inquiries

In this post we address the importance of public awareness surrounding inquiries, and how this awareness can increase the relevance and impact of these investigations. A recent Guardian article, written by ‘Alison’*, states the importance of the public’s consciousness of inquiries, as it keeps the spotlight on those under investigation. The article explores the representation of public inquiries in a new BBC crime drama ‘Sherwood’. While it is noted that the series fails to address the abuses of spy cops, which often occur in secret operations, the series does encourage conversations on publicising and spreading awareness of these investigations and challenging institutional power. 

Categories
Blog

Individualisation of State War Crimes

This week we discuss the critique of the Iraq Historic Allegations Team (or IHAT) that it failed to ‘bring justice’ and address the atrocities committed by British troops against Iraqi civilians during the Iraq war. The IHAT investigation lasted from 2010 until its subsequent dissolvement in 2018, running largely in parallel with the Iraq ‘Chilcot’ Inquiry. This post reflects upon an archival Guardian podcast episode from 2018 titled “Why we may never know if British troops committed war crimes in Iraq” and considers the limitations of international criminal justice and legal forms of individualisation in addressing war crimes committed by state soliders.

Categories
Blog

An Accidental Admission of Guilt?

George W. Bush mistakenly described the Iraq Invasion as “wholly unjustified” and “brutal” in recent speech. In a recent speech on Wednesday (18th May 2022), former United States president George W Bush reminded the world of the ongoing consequences of the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq and the violence of the intervention.